Tattoo- Wabisabi and Wuwei

Yesterday I got my first tattoos. It’s amazeing how much it reminds you how human you are as it is done. The one line needs to be retouched already but It’s best to wait a while.  I am going to work on a new banner for this blog along side with my girlfriend over at Ruin and Rebirth. Please look forward to the new look of Tea Journey. A special Chinese New Year post is coming up. I’m off to work now, till then, Ja ne.

Tattoo
1                  Tattoo 2

  無     

 爲

“Wabi
sabi”       “Wu
wei”

represents a comprehensive Japanese world view or aesthetic centered on the acceptance of transience. The aesthetic is sometimes described as one of beauty that is “imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete”.[1] It is a concept derived from the Buddhist teaching of the three marks of   existence (三法印 sanbōin?), specifically impermanence (無常 mujō?), the other two being suffering (dukkha) and emptiness or absence of self-nature (sunyata).

Characteristics of the wabi-sabi aesthetic include asymmetryasperity (roughness or irregularity), simplicity, economy, austerity, modesty, intimacy and appreciation of the ingenuous integrity of natural objects and processes.

a variant and derivatives: traditional Chinese: 無為; simplified Chinese: 无为; pinyinwú wéiJapanese: 無為; Korean: 무위;VietnameseVô vi) is an important concept of Taoism (Daoism), that involves knowing when to act and when not to act. Another perspective to this is that “Wu Wei” means natural action – as planets revolve around the sun, they “do” this revolving, but without   “doing” it; or as trees grow, they “do”, but without “doing”. Thus knowing when (and how) to act is not knowledge in the sense that one would think “now” is the right time to do “this“, but rather just doing it, doing the natural thing.

Wu may be translated as not have or withoutWei may be translated as do, act, serve as, govern or effort. The literal meaning of Wu Wei is “without action”, “without effort”, or “without control”, and is often included in the paradox wei wu wei: “action without action” or “effortless doing”. The practice of wu wei and the efficacy of wei wu wei are fundamental tenets in Chinese thought and have been mostly emphasized by the Taoist school. The aim of wu wei is to achieve a state of perfect equilibrium, or alignment with the Tao, and, as a result, obtain an irresistible form of “soft and invisible” power.

There is another less commonly referenced sense of wu wei; “action that does not involve struggle or excessive effort”. In this instance, Wu means “without” and Wei means “effort”. The concept of “effortless action” is a part of Taoist Internal martial arts such as T’ai chi ch’uanBaguazhang andXing Yi. It follows that Wu wei complies with the main feature and distinguishing characteristic of Taoism, that of being natural. To apply wu wei to any situation is to take natural action.

In Zen Calligraphy, Wu Wei has been represented as a circle