Let’s Talk Taiwanese Oolong: Alishan Jin Xuan Oolong

 Taiwanese Oolongs have a special place in my heart as they are one of the first teas I tried when I begun my Tea Journey.  So in dedication to the leaf and Taiwanese teas, we are going to look at 5 different Oolongs throughout September. To see past posts check out our “Let’s Talk Oolong” page.

Taiwanese Oolongs have a special place in my heart as they are one of the first teas I tried when I begun my Tea Journey.  So in dedication to the leaf and Taiwanese teas, we are going to look at 5 different Oolongs throughout September. Our third tea is Alishan Jin Xuan Oolong

Another week so that means another installment for “Let’s Talk Taiwanese Oolong”! Alishan is up there along with Oriental Beauty in my top favorites of Taiwanese oolongs.  This series has helped refresh my memory of all the little points that make these teas truly unique.
   But let’s get back to Alishan Jin Xuan. This tea is grown on Alishan Mountain, the most famous mountain of Taiwan (making it a big tourist attraction). During the time that Taiwan was occupied (1895-1945) many of this mountains giant evergreens were exported.  This area is now a protected area with a natural park, protecting many differnt forms of life.

Taiwanese Oolongs have a special place in my heart as they are one of the first teas I tried when I begun my Tea Journey.  So in dedication to the leaf and Taiwanese teas, we are going to look at 5 different Oolongs throughout September. Our third tea is Alishan Jin Xuan Oolong

    On this very mountain is where this tea is grown, between 700 – 1700m above sea level. In the area of Nantou, high quality- high altitude grown tea is produced. From tasting many different teas grown at high altitudes, I find they have a unique smoothness that comes though in the brewing.
    This tea produced a golden liquor that sooths the body with every sip (or in my case eases a sore throat). The lingering sweet finish with some nectar or honey like notes coat your mouth and throat evenly.  The taste that it starts with has fruit and pastry notes with a touch of vegetalness that lingers beneath.  It is very smooth and calms the body.  The taste is due to the similar cultivar we have seen already so far, QinXin. It is what gives the floral smell to the leaves after they are steeped. The best way to describe this tea though is yumm.

Taiwanese Oolongs have a special place in my heart as they are one of the first teas I tried when I begun my Tea Journey.  So in dedication to the leaf and Taiwanese teas, we are going to look at 5 different Oolongs throughout September. Our third tea is Alishan Jin Xuan Oolong

  Now that fall has set in finally (and the cold), make sure you are taking care of yourself. Best wishes to all my readers to your health and well being.

  What teas do you turn to once fall has set in?
P.S. The Tea Ave Giveaway has been extended to September 25th at Midnight! Get yourself in there for some yummy Oolongs from Tea Ave!